About the QSS Lab

The Quantitative Science Studies Lab is a research group led by Philippe Mongeon, Assistant Professor at the School of Information Management (SIM), Dalhousie University.

The lab is named after the recently launched Quantitative Science Studies (QSS) journal, which is the official open access journal of the International Society for Scientometrics and Informetrics (ISSI)

The lab aims to advance knowledge on the social and informational dynamics of science and its interactions with society.

Projects

A critical review of measures of research novelty

In this project, we compare the different research novelty measures that have been proposed in the literature by applying them to the same set of publications, and to a set of 1200 funding applications submitted for the Villum Experiment and scored by reviewers for their originality.

A typology of Twitter use by academics

This project investigates the different ways in which researchers share scholarly works on Twitter using the socio-topical distance approach proposed by Mongeon (2018). The research questions are as follows: What types of Twitter use can be identified using the socio-topical distance approach?

Citizen science

Citizen science (CS) is related to the general public engagement in the scientific research process in which the citizens participate in different ways. This project aims to gain a better understanding of the nature and outcomes of CS projects.

Digging into archives

This work is a quantitative exploration of archival scholarship that aims to describe the social and topical structure of the field, it’s evolution, and it’s relationship with other disciplines.

Do you cite what you tweet?

This work revisits the relationship between tweets and citations from a new information behavior perspective, where the tweet (and not the tweeted publication) is the unit of analysis. The main question is to determine if, at the individual level, the act of tweeting a given publication is a good predictor of the act of citing that same publication.

Fostering novelty and risk taking in research

The Villum Experiment is a funding program aimed at supporting bold, risky, and truly innovative research ideas that are unlikely to be supported by traditional funding sources. This project aims to provide empirical evidence of the effectiveness of the program by answering the following research questions:

Gender Homophily in Citations

The term “gender homophily” in citations describes an effect whereby the citer disproportionately cites references from authors who are of the same gender. One of the explanations for men’s disproportionate preference for citing men is the Matilda effect—a systematic under-recognition of women’s contribution to science.

Global uptake of Open Access

The purpose of this paper is to provide a global picture of the current state of OA adoption by countries, using two indicators: publications in OA and references to articles in OA.

Mapping the Canadian LIS research landscape

The main goal of this project is to build a tool to map and explore the research output of the eight ALA-accredited information schools in Canada, with a focus of the specicific contribution of schools in shaping the Canadian LIS research landscape.

Reducing socio-demographic disparities in funding with double-blind peer-review

This paper analyses three years (2017-2019) of application and review data from the Villum Experiment to analyze how the applicants are distributed by past performance, gender, age, professional status, and institutional affiliations, and how these distributions compare to the overall Danish research population.

Social justice in LIS research

Main goal This project will identify scholarly work that mentions social justice issues and identify trends in the prevalence of these mentions in the literature. Research questions Some of the questions will be:

The cost of Open Access under the acamemic publishing oligopoly

This study focuses on the cost and profit of OA publishing since 2010 by analyzing the publishing market as well as article processing charges for gold and hybrid open access journal publications.

The mental health crisis in academia

The goal of this project is to provide insights into the mental health of academic researchers affiliated to universities around the world that are active Twitter users. While surveys and interviews are the most commonly used methods to analyze the mental health of individuals and groups, these approaches have disadvantages such as their limited scale, their reliance on self-reported information, and their inability to measure public disclosure behaviours.

The role of journals in shaping knowledge and communitities

This project investigates how knowledge communities are developed and delineated through scholarly journals. The concept of journal scope is brought to the forefront and measured with a novel indicator that enables to compare the social and topical structures of different journals and seek explanations for the observed differences.

The socio-topical landscape of shark research and its visibility in the media

The goal of this research collaboration between the QSS lab and the Environmental Information Use and Influence (EIUI) group is to contribute to the discussion by providing an empirical basis for assessing the unequal representation and attention that different bodies of literature receive in social media specifically.

The use of “golden tickets” in funding peer-review

In this project hosted by the Danish Centre for Studies in Research and Research Policy (CFA) we use game theory to investigate the use of the golden ticket by reviewers and its effect on the review outcome of the last three iterations (2017-2019) of the Villum Experiment.

People

Researchers

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Cora-Lynn Munroe-Lynds

Research Assistant

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Emily McClean

Research Assistant

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Georgia Konstantinidis

Research assistant

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Grace Bourret

Research Assistant

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Hita Swamy

Master’s student

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Jessie Hill

School of Information Studies, McGill University

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Joel Thomas

Master’s Student

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Jordan Audas

Research Assistant

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Kendell Fitzgerald

Research Assistant

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Keshava Pallavi Gone

Master’s student

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Kory Melnick

Research Assistant

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Lisa Olson

Research Assistant

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Mohammed Azka Gowda

Research Assistant

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Philippe Mongeon

Assistant Professor, School of Information Management, Dalhousie University

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Poppy Riddle

Research Assistant

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Ratna Dhaliwal

Research Assistant

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Razia Choudhury

Research Assistant

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Sydney Francolini

Research Assistant

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Tamanna Moharana

Research Assistant

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Theresa Boulos

Research Assistant

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Vinson Li

Research Assistant

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Yifan Liu

Research Assistant

Collaborators

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Carita Mirjami Eklund

Postdoctoral researcher, Aarhus University

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Emil Bargmann Madsen

PhD Candidate, Aarhus University

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Fei Shu

Postdoctoral researcher at McGill University, and Senior researcher at Hangzhou Dianzi University

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Gita Ghiasi

Research Officer, IVADO & Université de Montréal

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Isabelle Dorsch

PhD Candidate, Heinrich Heine University Düsseldorf

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Jean-Sébastien Sauvé

Professeur Adjoint, Université de Montréal

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Kristof van Criekingen

Postdoctoral researcher, Aarhus University

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Marc-André Simard

PhD Student, Université de Montréal

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Maxime Sainte-Marie

Postdoctoral researcher, Aarhus University

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Nuria Bautista Puig

Researcher, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid

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Rodrigo Costas

Senior Researcher, Centre for Science and Technology Studies (CWTS)

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Rémi Toupin

PhD Candidate, Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM)

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Shenmeng Xu

Research Scientist, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

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Timothy D. Bowman

Assistant Professor, Wayne State University

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Yaxi Zhao

PhD Student, University of Toronto

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